Staff & Board Members

Our Team

 

Our team is made up of passionate people focused on building community.

Our Everyday Heroes

Staff Members

Frankie Roe

George Olebar

Credible Messenger, Youth Peer Leader, Board Member

 

Through our Politicizing our Youth project, George has worked with District 34 Senator Joe Nguyen and his legislative campaign in 2020 , lead forums with the Seattle School Board and City & County Council election process to ensure youth needs and concerns were visible and delivered from them as leaders.  He was a participant in the UW Global Violence Prevention to address systemic inequity surrounding gang intervention and mass incarceration.  Collaborated as a contractor with an editor at Seattle Times on an article on Covid-19 and its impact on youth

Khalia Williams-O'Neal

Elizabela Camacho

Youth Program Manager

 

 Since I was a young child, I always aspired to help people, I’ve considered social services, working in the justice system, and even the military.

I ran away from home at the young age of 16 and lost sight of what I wanted to do in life. I was stuck in auto pilot doing as I was told and confining myself to societal standards.

As an adult I started gravitating more towards a movement that better aligned with my aspirations. I found myself working alongside my partner Chandon “Monk” Tupai, doing countless community outreach projects and providing resources to those deemed disposable in our community.

My “why” is to assist in breaking stereotypes and stigmas drawn from indifference and judgment, as I seen firsthand what they can do to our young people, and our communities. As a Credible Messenger I envision and am in pursuit of the promise and potential to create everlasting impact.

Khalia Williams-O'Neal

Johnny Cheng

Operations Director

 

My “WHY” is to bring those from the margins to the center of the work. Through the Khmer proverb: “It takes a spider to repair its own web”, I practice commitment to the youth with the same love and compassion as my own children.

My journey as a Credible Messenger began with work through Khmer in Action with the goal to bring equity and social justice to the Cambodian community.

Recognizing the siloed effort, my goal became to join a consortium of like-minded partners to empower all marginalized communities.

Khalia Williams-O'Neal

Khalia Williams-O'Neal

Youth Project Manager

 

Khalia Williams-O’Neal graduated from Seattle University with a Bachelor’s degree in Communication and Media with a specialization in Journalism and a minor in Criminal Justice. While in college, Khalia worked for three years as a Team Lead at the Extended Learning Program at Bailey Gatzert Elementary through the Center for Community Engagement at Seattle University. While working at Bailey Gatzert, Khalia was inspired to work with youth and aiding them towards academic success.

While in her final year of university, Khalia began her internship at Seattle Goodwill as a Youth Program Assistant for the Youth Maritime Program. Khalia produced and facilitated equity and inclusion trainings to employers and assisted in job readiness work with at-risk youth of color. Through her work at Bailey Gatzert and Seattle Goodwill, Khalia found a passion for working within her community and advocating for Black and Brown youth’s success. Khalia plans to advocate for youth of color in every space she enters and hopes to continue that mission with Credible Messenger.

Jason Clark

Jason Clark

Director, Consultant

 

Jason Clark is a Father, Mentor as well as Director and Consultant for Northwest Credible Messenger (NWCM), a Capacity Building organization focused on empowering the next generation of local Black and Brown leadership. Previously, as a Project Manager Jason has had success in both City and County level positions.

As an Equity and Justice Advocate for King County Superior Court, Jason utilized his skills set to sharpen the Procedural Justice lens of the largest trial court in the state of Washington, through training all staff and judicial officers, policy advocacy and building alternatives to incarceration for King County Juvenile Court Services. As a Project Manager for the City of Seattle, Jason was laser focused on growing the leadership of various government depts and community partnerships through Racial Equity, Experiential Learning Theory, and Healing Centered Engagement.

A major focus of his work prior to starting NWCM was the Equity Impact Review, ensuring that equity impacts were the focus and consideration of the design and implementation of proposed actions of Superior Court programs and projects impacting target communities, undoing institutional barriers and archaic policies and procedures negatively impacting local communities.

Jason utilizes his personal and professional experience to build bridges of transformation between communities and systems throughout Washington state and is laser-focused on justice reform. Whether it’s empowering new and emerging or previously incarcerated leaders to achieve their professional goals, providing strategic advice on policy analysis and program development for city, county, and state leadership, or building programs to impact the school-to-prison pipeline, Jason is committed to effectuating change and impacting justice reform in Washington State through community-level consortium efforts focused on Capacity Building, Policy Advocacy and Positive Youth Justice.

Jason is a 2021 Prosecution Beyond Big Cities Leader for the Institute of Innovation in Prosecution at John Jay College, a 2019 JLUSA Leading with Conviction Fellow and a 2019 Civil Survival Justice in Policy Fellow. He has a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration and is a certified Project Manager. Jason’s organization, NWCM, is the Washington State Ambassador for CM3, the National Credible Messenger Mentoring Movement.

Passionate Community Leaders

Board Members

Frankie Roe

Frankie Roe

Board Member

 

Frankie Roe is a six-time author, career coach, professional development trainer, publishing consultant, and innovative thinker. She founded the Young Urban Authors program in 2010 and has successfully published 29 hard to serve youth, in three distinctive underserved neighborhoods in the Seattle area.

Frankie has a sincere desire to reduce recidivism by helping individuals discover their gifts and creating opportunities that match their natural abilities. Her purpose is to help men and women recovering from active addiction and returning citizens use their gifts as a guide to find fulfillment and purpose.

Frankie has worked in the social services sector for over 10 years and has served hundreds of men, women, and teens. She inspired and pushed them to accomplish goals and start careers they never envisioned for themselves.

The opportunity to continue to serve the community in solidarity with Credible Messengers is a beautifully written next chapter in this book called life. She believes in shattering stereotypes and breaking down systems of oppression; one person and one community at a time.

Frankie Roe

George Olebar

Credible Messenger, Youth Peer Leader, Board Member

 

George Olebar is 21 and a certified Credible Messenger & Youth Peer Leader and board member of NWCM. He is immersed in various consulting opportunities, policy advocacy, project management roles and is a peer project manager of our “Politicizing our Youth Campaign” which gives voice to our young people and supports their vision of leadership and action that addresses needs in our communities, schools and systems in our state. He is currently a part of a 24 part curriculum learning community on healthy masculinity and the impact on our youth.

Frankie Roe

Joseph Todd

Board Member

 

Joseph Todd is currently the Deputy Chief Technology Officer at King County, WA where he is focusing on innovating operations, and co-leading the shift of the organization to a product based delivery model.

Joseph has over 20 years of experience as a technology practitioner and leader including a background in accelerating the modernization and delivery of IT services in aerospace, software development, systems integration, enterprise collaboration, local government, and technology innovation.

Before his tenure at King County, Joseph served as CIO of the City of Tukwila, Senior Manager of Application Development and Collaboration at Alaska Airlines, and Senior Manager of Enterprise Collaboration and Application Integration at The Boeing Company.

 

Outside of work Joseph enjoys tutoring students in math and science, working with schools on implementing technology in the classroom, and spending time running and hiking with his wife and son. Oh did we mention he’s running for Renton City Council Position 1.

You can learn more about Joseph:

www.votejoetodd.com

Lorna Staten Sylvester

Lorna Staten Sylvester

Board Member

 

I am graduate of the University of Florida, where I earned an undergraduate degree in Business Administration. In the pursuit of procedural justice, I earned a J.D. from Florida State University and have been admitted to the State Bar of Georgia and the Washington State Bar Association.

During the summer of 1995 while in law school, I had a unique opportunity to serve as a judicial clerk in Harare, Zimbabwe. That experience allowed me to view firsthand a remarkably different legal system that did not include the right to counsel. I’ve been advocating for procedural justice and growing my legal experience ever since.

I’ve served as a law clerk, a legal assistant in tobacco litigation, and as a criminal defense attorney for the Northwest Defender’s Association involved in the full range of misdemeanor practice in the Seattle Municipal Court, eventually transitioning into prosecution in Washington and Georgia.

I have experience working in the Domestic Violence unit, as well as with training new prosecutors, assuming the role of supervisor as needed and regularly appearing in court.

Since February 2019, I have been working in the area of Civil litigation, and currently, I am responsible for a wide range of specialties, advising several different clients on marijuana issues, fire code compliance issues, utilities issues, encroachment issues, and labor standards issues.

In my spare time, I enjoy traveling, volunteering as a board member for Northwest Credible Messenger, and shopping. My greatest joy is as a basketball mom, watching my son, Takeo, play AAU basketball.

Frankie Roe

Dr. Max Hunter

Board Member

 

Dr. Max Hunter grew up amidst outlaw culture and streets gangs experiencing during the War on Drugs in Southern California, and Washington D.C. Hunter earned his Ph.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies and master’s degree in bioethics from the University of Washington, and two master’s degrees, in history of science and education, from Harvard University. As a professor, Hunter developed a premedical program focused on health disparities and the social determinants of health while serving as chair of diversity, equity, and inclusion for a national organization for prehealth advisors. As liaison to the American Medical College Association in that role, he worked on a revolutionary-model for holistic medical education. Dr. Hunter seeks to understand health disparities and the roots and perpetuation of literacy ambivalence among black men. He has served as board chair on non-profits that established mental health and pediatric clinics for the urban poor and equity in bioethics at Harvard and the University of Washington.

During the pandemic, Dr. Hunter revised his award-winning dissertation that focuses on black males experiencing ambivalence regarding issues related identity, black authenticity, literacy, and masculinity: Reading While black. He also founded Stories and Theories: A Narrative-based Approach to Consulting and Life-Coaching. As the storyteller-in-chief, his goal is to facilitate personal and professional transformation—whole-person changes—through engagement with critical theory, literacy analysis, autobiography, and memoir. Dr. Hunter’s interest in Credible Messengers is connected to his own biography, being born into a family with black male elders who were felons and did time in California prisons. As a shoe-shine boy in middle school, he began to forge an identity as a preppy hustler, presaging the character String Bell on The Wire. Based on these experiences with illiteracy, poverty, and violence, he hopes to leverage his education, experiences, and social capital to serve the most marginalized communities. A renowned omnivore and a noteorioius soccer dad, he lives enjoying cooking, dining out, listening to music with his boys in their convertible VW, and walking up and down Alki Beach with his family in Seattle, WA.

Frankie Roe

Patricia J Rangel

Board Member

 

Patricia J Rangel is a storyteller, designer, and educator. As a child of two Colombian immigrants, she is one of the only members of her extended family to be born and raised in the United States. She is the first member of her immediate family to attend university and graduate school. She earned a bachelor’s in business administration from the University of Notre Dame and her master’s in teaching from the University of Portland. In 2012 she received an administrative certificate from the University of Washington’s Danforth Educational Leadership Program. Her twenty-four-year career as an educator culminated as an assistant principal within Seattle Public School. However, throughout that entire time, she taught everything from pre-school to graduate school in places as far-reaching as Birmingham, Alabama to Fremantle, Australia. Throughout her travels, she encountered students and colleagues that inspired her vision of education and community development in profound ways. She is now commencing a second career pursuing a master’s in architecture from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her goal is to gain skills to bring greater equity and inclusiveness into the built environment. Her admiration for the work of Credible Messengers and the transformative nature of empowering those that are involved in its movement is a motivating force to integrate her past and future professions. Its model of building capacity and uplifting black and brown leadership through positive youth justice is critical to then offering society a wider swath of leaders, innovators, and contributors to various professions and institutions.